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Showing posts from March, 2020

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Sankat Mochan Hanuman Ashtak Listen Daily

DON’T BE AFRAID TO HIRE SOMEONE WHO’S CURRENTLY UNEMPLOYED

It’s easier to get a new job when you already have a job. We all intuitively know this to be true, but why is that the case? If you ask recruiters and hiring managers why they don’t hire individuals who are  unemployed  when they apply for a role, it’s usually because they’re basing their decision on some preconceived notions and biases: If you’ve been fired from one job, there must be something wrong with you. If you quit without a new job lined up, you must not be a dedicated employee. If you stayed at home with your kids, you’ll always be running out the door early. If you were out for health reasons, you’ll get sick again. In reality, most of these reasons are excuses for hiring managers to avoid critically evaluating all applicants and opting instead for the easy route. Ultimately, hiring managers prefer to recruit and hire employed versus unemployed candidates simply because they assume someone else already evaluated them, hired them and values their work enough to keep them. But

DEAR REWORKER: WHEN SALARIED EMPLOYEES TAKE TIME OFF FOR MEDICAL REASONS, WHAT HAPPENS TO THEIR PAY?

Dear ReWorker, I have a new (two-months-employed) salaried exempt employee that has been taking between three and six hours a week to go to doctor’s appointments. He says that this will not continue forever and should soon stabilize to a monthly appointment. He has expressed to me multiple times in writing that he does not expect to be paid for the hours that he is taking off. Can you shed some light on any laws that I should know about for salaried employees and taking time off? Sincerely, Stumped About Sick Time ________________________________________________________________________ Dear Stumped About Sick Time, First of all, your new employee sounds incredibly thoughtful. He recognized that his medical appointments impact the business and volunteered to forgo pay. Second, you have to turn down his generous offer. Being paid on a salary basis means he receives a  predetermined amount of compensation that must stay the same every pay period , according to the Fair Labor Standards Act

HOW TO INCLUDE YOUR REMOTE WORKERS IN HOLIDAY FESTIVITIES

Remote work is becoming increasingly popular, offering employees  a flexible schedule  and saving them time and money that is usually spent on commuting. Studies show that  telecommuters are more productive than their office counterparts . According to a FlexJobs  report , 65% of workers believe they’re more productive at home than in a traditional office. However, there’s also a downside of remote work: Many remote workers suffer from FOMO, or fear of missing out. While their in-office colleagues are spending time together, remote workers are often removed from the social aspect of their jobs. These feelings of isolation are especially apparent during the holiday season, with events like holiday parties and secret santa exchanges. If your remote workers are local, then you can surely invite them into the office for an annual party and exchange some home-baked cookies. But when you have employees that work from locations all across the country (or around the world), it is unlikely that

DEAR REWORKER: AS A MIDDLE MANAGER, HOW CAN I IMPROVE THE TOXIC CULTURE AT MY COMPANY?

Dear ReWorker, I took a new job in middle management. The company culture isn’t great, and my staff is unhappy. I can’t change policy, and I can’t fix the CEO. How can I make it a better place to work when I don’t have any real power? Sincerely, Stuck in the Middle _________________________________________________________________________ Dear Stuck in the Middle, The bad news is that a terrible CEO (and a board that refuses to act) is almost impossible to fix from below. The good news is that there is a lot you can do to protect your staff. But, there’s one essential thing you need to remember: You’re not obligated to sacrifice yourself for your team. Yes, a good manager makes sacrifices to help lead people, but there is a limit, and that limit is sacrificing your health (mental and/or physical). I give this caution because good people at bad companies tend to want to make everything better, and so they try so hard that they end up burning out. If the CEO is toxic and you feel like you

WANT TO DIVERSIFY YOUR WORKFORCE? YOU MAY NEED TO RETHINK THE INTERVIEW

The data is clear: When an organization hires a diverse workforce—people who represent different races, income levels, nationalities and genders—it performs better. Bringing these varied perspectives to the table results in more creative thinking. According to a Boston Consulting Group report, diversity is a key driver of innovation, and companies with diverse teams produce  19% more revenue  than their competition. When it comes to increasing diversity at their organization, many HR teams look to diversify their candidate pool. But while this is an important step, it's only part of the solution. Actually hiring those diverse candidates means adjusting the interview to make sure that it's not putting them at a disadvantage. Beyond determining who is most qualified, here are some ways companies can encourage diversity—and guarantee a quality hire. Pay Attention to the Time  Traditionally, recruiters conduct interviews during times when they are in the office. For most companies,

DEAR REWORKER: WHEN SALARIED EMPLOYEES TAKE TIME OFF FOR MEDICAL REASONS, WHAT HAPPENS TO THEIR PAY?

Dear ReWorker, I have a new (two-months-employed) salaried exempt employee that has been taking between three and six hours a week to go to doctor’s appointments. He says that this will not continue forever and should soon stabilize to a monthly appointment. He has expressed to me multiple times in writing that he does not expect to be paid for the hours that he is taking off. Can you shed some light on any laws that I should know about for salaried employees and taking time off? Sincerely, Stumped About Sick Time ________________________________________________________________________ Dear Stumped About Sick Time, First of all, your new employee sounds incredibly thoughtful. He recognized that his medical appointments impact the business and volunteered to forgo pay. Second, you have to turn down his generous offer. Being paid on a salary basis means he receives a  predetermined amount of compensation that must stay the same every pay period , according to the Fair Labor Standards Act

WHAT CAN HR DO TO HELP PREVENT BURNOUT?

Have you ever felt just... done? Overwhelmed, utterly exhausted and detached or unmotivated at work? If that feeling persists for longer than a day or two, you may well be suffering from burnout as a result of chronic stress (often tied to your job). In fact, the World Health Organization  recently categorized  burnout as an official health condition — and it’s not one to be taken lightly. In a systematic review of studies, burnout was found to be a  significant predictor  of numerous health problems including Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, fatigue, respiratory issues, insomnia and depressive symptoms, among others. And companies with burned-out employees don’t fare well, either. According to a  Gallup study ,  employees suffering from burnout are 2.6 times as likely to be actively seeking a different job, 63% more likely to take a sick day and 23% more likely to visit the emergency room. That’s in addition to the expected nose dive in productivity and engagement. But  there are many

DEAR REWORKER: WHAT SHOULD I DO WHEN AN EMPLOYEE COMES TO ME WITH A PERSONAL PROBLEM?

Dear ReWorker, What do you do when an employee comes to you with a personal problem? I’m not a therapist or lawyer. I don’t want to send people away from my office, but am I supposed to do anything with this type of information? People tell me about divorce, abuse, financial issues, kid problems — everything! Help! Sincerely, Overly Involved _________________________________________________________________________ Dear Overly Involved, This is a common problem for human resources managers. We are the people employees go to when they need to take time off for a health problem, so it makes sense that they want to discuss their health with us. We are the people they go to when they need help managing their relationship with your boss, so why shouldn’t they mention their marital problems? When workers come to you, you need to divide everything into two categories: issues that call for you to act and those that don’t. Here is what goes where. When You Need to Act Health problems : If a cond

DEAR REWORKER: IS THERE EVER A CASE FOR REHIRING SOMEONE YOU ONCE FIRED?

Dear ReWorker, We had a long-term employee who was unreliable—coming in late, calling in sick often, leaving early—who we eventually fired. Now, three years later, he’s applied again. My boss says it’s better to hire him, as we won’t have to train. I’m hesitant to rehire someone who we fired in the first place. What do you think? Sincerely, Skeptical of Second Chances _________________________________________________________________________ Dear Skeptical of Second Chances, Let me get right to it.  Rehiring people who you fired for poor performance, unreliability or cause? Probably not the best idea.  This individual, in particular, was a long-term employee who repeatedly showed you who he was. You have no reason to believe that he’s changed. If you rehire him, chances are he’ll call in sick, come in late and leave early. (I am assuming that he didn’t call in sick, but “sick” and didn’t have a genuine disability or illness that would be protected under the Americans with Disabilities A

HOW TO RECOVER FROM A DECADE OF LOST EMPLOYEE ENGAGEMENT

Despite years of effort by HR professionals,  Gallup’s latest findings  indicate that 70 percent of the U.S. and 87 percent of the global workforce are disengaged or emotionally disconnected from their work, costing businesses billions of dollars each year. Little progress has been made on the state of employee engagement since 1999, when the Gallup Organization’s groundbreaking work  First Break All the Rules: What the World's Greatest Managers Do Differently  took the industry (and  New York Times  bestseller list) by storm.  How is this possible? Interestingly, a  2014 survey of HR leaders  found the top three methods currently used to promote engagement are recognition, work-life balance and wellness. In the survey, retention was the most frequently used metric to gauge the effectiveness of engagement programs. Recently, I was pleased to see a  Forbes  post  recognizing that corporate leaders are concerned that engagement has not been improving, then surprised to find its recom

STAR EMPLOYEES AREN'T ALWAYS MANAGEMENT MATERIAL – AND THAT'S OKAY

My colleague once shared a story about managing that I will never forget. At the conclusion of her company’s performance management process, one of the new manager’s evaluations were the most thoughtful, honest and actionable she’d ever seen – despite it being his first time providing formal feedback. Unfortunately, it was also his last time. Upon realizing the effort required to manage people, the employee decided to relinquish his managing role and return to his passion as a software developer.  I love this story because it highlights the importance of truly understanding people management. "Manager" is a responsibility – not just a fancy title – that requires a special set of skills and immense effort. And it's not for everybody: It should be okay for ambitious high performers to decline the management career path. The many consequences of ineffective and uncommitted managers take a high toll on organization effectiveness. Far too often, top individual contributors tra